PARAM VIR SINGH

 

Carnegie Bosch Institute Junior Chair and Associate Professor of Business Technologies
David A. Tepper School of Business
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
Phone: 412-268-3585

Param Vir Singh is Carnegie Bosch Junior Chair and Associate Professor of Business Technologies at the David A Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University. He holds a PhD in Business Administration from the Foster School of Business, University of Washintgon, Seattle. He holds Masters degrees in Business Administration and Interdisciplinary Studies from University of Washington and Texas Tech University, respectively. He also holds a Bachelors degree in Chemical Engineering from Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.

param vir singh

 

Professor Singh has served as the co-chair for the Conference of Information Systems and Technology, 2012, and the Workshop on Information Systems and Economics, 2012. He has served as the Information Systems Society cluster chair for the Informs Annual Meeting, 2011, as an Associate Editor for Information Systems Research (adhoc, and special issue), the International Conference on Information Systems (2011, 2012) as program committee member for Conference on Information Systems and Technology (2009, 2010, 2011) and ACM Conference on Electronic Commerce 2009, and as session chair for CORS-Informs 2009, and Informs Annual Meeting 2009.

 

Professor Singh investigates the use of social technologies (such as crowdsourcing, blogging, enterprise 2.0, open source) to solve business problems. Specifically, he studies user behavior on social technologies to provide policy and design implications to foster innovation and knowledge sharing. Prof Singh's studies on blogs have addressed important questions regarding governance of employee blogs by firms. His research shows that prohibiting employees from posting content that criticizes the firm or promotes the rivals, or posting non work related content or encourgaing lurkers to blog are suboptimal policies with negative consequences for organizations. His work on crowdsourcing ideation provides policies for firms to govern their crowdsourcing initiatives for getting highly valuable new product ideas from consumers. He is presently investigating how to optimally design crowdsourcing contests for innovation. His work on open source has highlighted inefficiencies in the choice of licensing options and using social network methods have provided guidelines on successful team formations.

 

Much of his work uses big data sources such as social networks, blogs, online help forums, and online crowdsourcing platforms to provide a fine grained and rich analysis. To deal with and benefit from the volume and variety of data, for methodology Professor Singh employs a variety of skills including structural models, text mining, social networks, Bayesian methods and reduces form analysis. Professor Singh is an early proponent for the use of structural modeling methods to answer policy and system design questions in the field of Information Systems.